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Does anyone have any bad experiences with SSDs?
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Jericho





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 10:31    Post subject: Does anyone have any bad experiences with SSDs? Reply with quote Print

I've never had a hard-drive failure, I've never had a single issue with any HDD since the very first 386 pc that I built.

Yesterday my C-drive had a hiccup (The dreaded clicking sound that I recognize so well from my mother's computer that I used to rebuild twice a year for a decade) and I had to force a shutdown. Then it took over an hour repairing itself.

So I was thinking of finally moving into 2009 and using an SSD for my Windows drive.


Now... About 6 years ago, I did buy a couple of 250Gb SSDs and copied Win7 onto one. It worked great!!! For about 10 mins, then it would reboot.

So now I'm a bit wary of repeating the mistake. Has anyone had similar issues these days with SSD? I assumed it was some BIOS issue, but I've been through a few motherboards since then, and firmware updates are much simpler these days.

It would also be a good opportunity for me to get rid of a load of rubbish so I can clone my huge C drive down to a 500gb ssd.

(Also is there any benefit in getting smaller 250GB drives instead, as they are cheaper, and I can just stack them up, assuming my mobo can handle that many. Or is the general rule, go for a big one?)


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birdtable





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 10:50    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

250GB as OS plus a 500GB for entertainment .... Well that is what I wished I had done instead of a single 500GB for both...
Sizes vary with required usage.

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Tycow





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 11:00    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I bought a Crucial 1TB one from their basic range about a year and half ago for my gaming laptop, and it died in the middle of cloning my old 1TB HDD to it. It wouldn't even show up in the BIOS or Diskmgmt.msc when plugged in to any PC...

Amazon replaced it, and once I got the new one set up and working I've never looked back. Booting to Windows is fast. Loading games is fast.

When my HDD in desktop starts fading, I'll be replacing it with an SSD.

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red assassin





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 12:19    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I've only ever had one issue with an SSD - a really old one I had flat out refused to work with a much newer PC. That's it - I've certainly never lost any data from one (looking at you, HDDs). I still use a pair of 2TB spinning disks for bulk data storage, but I've had my OS etc on SSD for nearly a decade and never looked back.


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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 12:44    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

The only problem I've ever had with an SSD was self-inflicted--it messed up while I was trying to flash its firmware. Completely dead, had to throw it away. I've had three other SSDs, including the 480Gb one that's my main OS and games drive in my home PC, and they all work fine. I think the MTBF on modern SSDs is so long that you would expect them to last for 5-10 years without issue.

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CBJ
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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 12:46    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I've probably had more issues with SSDs than most.

Of the 7 SSD drives I've owned, 5 of them have failed on me. The first two were set up in a RAID 0 array (yes, I know that's a bit peculiar) and both failed in fairly quick succession after a year or two of use. I replaced them with two more, this time set up in RAID 1, both of which also failed almost together after a year or two. The third pair were in a different PC, also set up in RAID 1; one of them failed after about 3 years, but the other is still working fine and I've not bothered to replace its partner. My most recent drive is in yet another different PC and is an m.2 drive. It's nice and fast, but I've not had it a year yet so I don't know how well it will last.

All of these drives have been set up as system drives and have had very heavy use. The very first pair were also used for project data, which means that they got a real hammering from the compiler. I've since decided to take the performance hit and store project data on an old-fashioned HDD to reduce that. My experiences have also led me to give up on RAID mirroring with SSDs; rather than having redundant disks to keep me operational in case of hard drive failure, I keep a whole second PC instead!

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Bishop149





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 13:05    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

Never for me, I've had a several HDD failures over the years but thus far [touch wood] no SSD problems.
If a bit of kit dies pretty much as soon as you try an use it you'd have a pretty good case to just RTM it for a replacement IMO.

What I do (and I think what many people do) is just have a relatively small SSD and just put the OS on it. At the time this was a cost issue but perhaps not so any more. Once the system is running ok, ghost image the drive and then don't store much on it. Worst case if the drive fails is buying a new one and restoring your image, no real data loss.


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CBJ
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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 13:12    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

Bishop149 wrote:
Once the system is running ok, ghost image the drive and then don't store much on it. Worst case if the drive fails is buying a new one and restoring your image, no real data loss.

How does this actually work on a system drive? If your system drive fails then you can't boot in order to restore the ghost image, and if you install a new system drive and boot from that then you can't restore the ghost image to it because you're running from it.

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Morkonan





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 13:35    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

CBJ wrote:
Bishop149 wrote:
Once the system is running ok, ghost image the drive and then don't store much on it. Worst case if the drive fails is buying a new one and restoring your image, no real data loss.

How does this actually work on a system drive? If your system drive fails then you can't boot in order to restore the ghost image, and if you install a new system drive and boot from that then you can't restore the ghost image to it because you're running from it.


Boot from USB/DVD.

Putting the OS on SSD for fast starts and accesses is common, these days. Having bulk data on traditional disk is also pretty common.

I imagine that standard HDs still have some life left in them, but SSDs and the like are gaining much more of a footprint. I'd like to add, though, that if the SSD fails or loses data or data gets deleted, you'll need professional recovery and a few physicists to try to recover anything without some ghost in the background, saving you from yourself or catastrophe. That's not true, necessarily, of traditional HDs, which are much easier when it comes down to recovering deleted data. (IMO)

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korio
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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 14:23    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I have a 275 GB M.2 for the SO, another 250gb SSD for games and like 3 TB on various HDD's.

Using them for a couple years, no problems so far.

If you do a clone of your SO drive and it's bootable all you need in case of fail is a pendrive with the recovery software you used, one of the most used is acronis and there are some others.

Recovering data from a "dead" ssd is much harder than from a failed HDD most of the times.


Also, if you dont want to risk buying SSD, you can checkout the "new" intel optane cards, it basically makes an HDD work fast like and SSD (i know it's not totally true, just a very quick explanation) and they are relatively cheap.

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euclid
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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 15:42    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

Morkonan wrote:

........
Boot from USB/DVD.
........

Exactly! I've replaced my (very) old system 64GB HD with a new 500GB and did not want to reinstall W10. So I've downloaded Macrium Reflect and used a 64GB USB flash drive to ghost/image (via Reflect) the system HD. After installing the new HD it took like 15 mins and everything was running fine again.

Cheers Euclid


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Jericho





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 16:01    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

Thanks guys, much appreciated.

I'll probably be getting a smaller one for the OS, and sort out Steam/Origin/Poser as and when necessary.


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pjknibbs



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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 17:02    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

Morkonan wrote:
I'd like to add, though, that if the SSD fails or loses data or data gets deleted, you'll need professional recovery and a few physicists to try to recover anything without some ghost in the background, saving you from yourself or catastrophe. That's not true, necessarily, of traditional HDs, which are much easier when it comes down to recovering deleted data. (IMO)


I don't think many people are going to be retrieving data off a traditional HDD that's actively failed without the services of a data recovery company. Recovering deleted data is harder due to most OSes using a "TRIM" command to remove the data from the SSD, that much is true, but that just takes us back to the old saying: if you're not backing that data up, you don't care if you lose it.

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burger1





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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 18:51    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I have 2 ssd drives on different computers and neither has failed yet.

On my main computer I have a 250 gb samsung evo and a 1tb hard drive. I keep most of my games backed up on an external 3 tb hard drive since they won't fit on the computer hard drives and downloading them would consume too much of my monthly internet data limit. I have seen external hard drives fail in various ways. They don't seem to be as reliable. I have never had a normal hard drive fail. I back up my important data (pictures/data) to google drive, google docs and the windows one drive thing. Storing your own important data on a computer that is more apt to get viruses and mechanical failure than a server seems riskier.

Also if you are cloning your OS to your new drive make sure to move the master boot record.

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jlehtone



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PostPosted: Wed, 13. Sep 17, 22:02    Post subject: Reply with quote Print

I haven't personally experienced a failure, but a friend had to replace one (on warranty). Due to controller, IIRC. Way back, when 80GB was still big.


@burger1:
(GPT + EFI) has no MBR. Do you use MBR as more generic term?

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